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Determinants of hangover following intravenous alcohol self-administration in non-dependent drinkers

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 — Poster Session I

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
FAES Terrace
NIAAA
BEHAV-4

Authors

  • BL Stangl
  • A Gogineni
  • E Corbin
  • LE Blau
  • V Vatsalya
  • VA Ramchandani

Abstract

Hangover has been associated with heavy drinking and may be relevant in the transition to problem drinking. The study examined hangover following intravenous alcohol self-administration (IV-ASA), using the Computer Assisted Infusion System (CAIS), with the goal of identifying predictors of hangover, including drinking history and alcohol sensitivity, in non-dependent drinkers. Eighty-nine non-dependent drinkers (21-45 years) completed an IV-ASA session where participants could push a button to receive individually standardized alcohol infusions. Expectancy for the effects of alcohol was measured using the Alcohol Effects Questionnaire (AEFQ). Subjective response to alcohol was measured using the Drug Effects Questionnaire (DEQ). Hangover symptoms were assessed for the period between participants’ departure from the study unit and 10AM the next morning, using the Alcohol Hangover Scale. 78% of participants endorsed having at least one hangover symptom following IV-ASA. The most common items reported were tired, thirsty, headache and hangover. There was no association between hangover scores and IV-ASA. Those positive for hangover symptoms had greater expectancies for the effects of alcohol and greater subjective response to the IV alcohol. The results indicated that greater expectancy for alcohol effects and subjective response to IV alcohol were positively associated with hangover symptoms in non-dependent drinkers, while consumption was not a driving factor of hangover symptoms. Because greater subjective response is associated with heavy drinking and predictive of alcohol use disorder, it is possible that hangover may be an early marker of this relationship.

Category: Social and Behavioral Sciences