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Banning tobacco price promotions, smoking-related beliefs and behavior: Findings from the ITC Four Country Survey

Friday, September 18, 2015 — Poster Session IV

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
FAES Terrace
NIMHD
BEHAV-7

Authors

  • SM El-Toukhy
  • K Choi

Abstract

Background: Little is known about how prohibiting tobacco price promotions at the national level influences smoking-related beliefs and behaviors. Method: We used data from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey. Smokers and former smokers at wave 8 (N = 4,114) were included in multivariate logistic regression models to examine associations between exposure to price promotions at waves 7 and 8 (conducted in 2009 and 2011) and smoking-related beliefs and behavior at wave 8, stratified by whether the countries allow (United States, Australia) or ban (Canada, United Kingdom) price promotions. Results: Exposure to price promotions was highest among Americans (85.9%) followed by British (41.2%), Canadians (32.6%), and Australians (24.8%). Associations between exposure to price promotions and smoking-related beliefs differed by tobacco price promotions ban status. Exposure to price promotions was associated with decision beliefs (e.g., spend too much on cigarettes; p < 0.05) in both ban- and no-ban countries. Only participants in no-ban countries who were exposed to price promotions were likely to endorse tobacco control strategies (e.g., tobacco products should be tightly regulated; p < 0.05). Repeated exposure to price promotions at waves 7 and 8 predicted current smoking at wave 8 in no-ban countries only (AOR: 1.59; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Differential associations emerged between exposure to tobacco price promotions and smoking-related beliefs across ban- vs. no-ban countries. Repeated exposure to price promotions predicted smoking behaviors in countries without a ban on tobacco price promotions. Adoption of promotions ban could eliminate effects of tobacco price promotions on smoking.

Category: Social and Behavioral Sciences