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Home > Concurrent Symposia Sessions > Towards Better Understanding of Gene Regulation: Mechanisms of Sequence and Structure Recognition, Impact of Chromatin Remodeling, and Genetic Variations

Concurrent Symposia Sessions

Wednesday, October 7, 2009
Natcher Conference Center
Symposia Session III
Main Auditorium

Towards Better Understanding of Gene Regulation: Mechanisms of Sequence and Structure Recognition, Impact of Chromatin Remodeling, and Genetic Variations
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Co-Chairs: Ivan Ovcharenko, NLM/NCBI and Teresa Przytycka, NLM/NCBI

The contribution of gene regulation to disease and genome evolution has been actively discussed since the sequence of the human genome revealed that only 2% of the human DNA codes for proteins. Much of the progress in understanding the genetic mechanisms of gene regulation has been attributed to effective coupling of computational and experimental studies, and advances in technology development. In particular, comparative genomics and artificial intelligence applied to genome pattern searches have been shown to be beneficial in locating regulatory elements and deciphering their function. Subsequently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) detecting disease-associated mutations in noncoding regions of the human genome have stressed the importance of these regions, and how subtle variations can have dramatic impacts on human health. To date, noncoding mutations have been linked to over 50 single or multi-gene disorders including cancer, AIDS, and heart disease; to name a few. Multiple computational biology and experimental directions are being explored in this rapidly growing field to facilitate the discovery of disease-causing noncoding mutations and to characterize disrupted gene regulatory pathways. Currently, studies performed by NIH Investigators are contributing to the rapid demarcation of the architecture of gene regula-tory networks of model organisms, and important insights are being gained form studies of evolutionary divergence and innovation in regulatory elements. Additionally, it is being recognized that gene regulatory elements are not encoded by sequence alone, but also by chromatin and DNA structures. Thus, a full understanding of gene regulation requires a multidimensional view that can only be provided by combining knowledge gained from different research perspectives.

Program

Presentation by FARE Award Winner
Detecting Conserved Function of Evolutionarily Diverged Noncoding Elements
Leila Taher, NLM

An Integrated Approach to Understanding Developmental Gene Regulatory Networks in Drosophila
Alan Michelson, NHLBI

Population-specific Deactivation of Repressive Elements
Laura Elnitski, NHGRI

The Genome-wide Distribution and Role of Non-B DNA In Vivo
David L. Levens, NCI

STATs and Epigenetic Regulation of Differentiating Helper T Cells
John O’Shea, NIAMS

The Global Organization of Nuclear Receptor Regulatory Elements
Ofir Hakim, NCI

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