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Would electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use reduce health disparities? Prevalence of daily e-cigarette use among cigarette smokers by race/ethnicity, education, and income

Thursday, September 13, 2018 — Poster Session IV

3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
FAES Terrace
NIMHD
HEALTH-4

Authors

  • K Choi
  • JC Chen

Abstract

Background: Many cigarette smokers use electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) to quit cigarette smoking. While some studies showed that e-cigarette use was associated with a lower likelihood of cigarette smoking cessation, other studies indicated that daily e-cigarette use was associated with a higher likelihood of cigarette smoking cessation. We examined the variations in prevalence of daily e-cigarette use among cigarette smokers. Methods: Current cigarette smokers participated in the 2014-2015 Tobacco Use Supplement of the Current Population Survey (n=23,232) reported daily e-cigarette use and past year quit attempt. Demographics were also collected. Weighted prevalence of daily e-cigarette use was estimated among all current cigarette smokers and among those who attempted to quit smoking in the past year (n=9,341). Multiple logistic regression was used to test if prevalence of daily e-cigarette use differed by demographics. Results: The prevalence of daily e-cigarette use was low among current cigarette smokers in general (1-6%) and those who attempted to quit smoking in the past year (2-9%). Multiple logistic regression showed that non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic cigarette smokers were less likely than non-Hispanic White cigarette smokers to use e-cigarette daily (AOR=0.38 and 0.45, respectively). Similar results were observed among those who made a quit attempt in the past year (AOR: non-Hispanic Black=0.40, Hispanic=0.38). No significant associations were observed between income, education, and daily e-cigarette use (p>0.05). Conclusions: Since racial/ethnic minorities and low socioeconomic status individuals often have higher prevalence of cigarette smoking, our findings suggest that e-cigarette use is likely to perpetuate or worsen health disparities.

Category: Health Disparities